Archive for the 'Talk Radio' Category

Fact check: Gardner demanded defunding Obamacare to avoid government shutdown

Monday, August 18th, 2014

The Associated Press’ Nicholas Riccardi reported Aug. 15 that senatorial candidate Cory Gardner’s spokesman, Alex Siciliano, “noted that, before the shutdown, Gardner had warned against requiring Democrats to defund the Affordable Care Act as a requirement for keeping government open.”

Maybe Siciliano doesn’t listen to Gardner much on talk radio. Maybe he’s too busy talking to reporters on behalf of his boss.

But when I read Riccardi’s piece, I recalled hearing Gardner advocate for, as opposed to against, demanding Dems defund Obamacare or face a government shutdown.

On August 1, 2013, two months before the government shutdown, Gardner told KOA’s Mike Rosen:

Rosen: “Perhaps we can talk about some other items on the agenda, such as the current dispute, even with the Republican Party, about whether Republicans, who have a majority in the House, ought to take a stand now, as the continuing resolution question comes up, take a stand on Obamacare, and refuse to fund it, while at the same time, agreeing with a continuing resolution that would allow the rest of the federal government to operate. Have you got a position on that?

Gardner: I want to do anything and everything I can to stop Obamacare from destroying our health care, from driving up increases in costs. Whether that’s through the continuing resolution, I want to defund everything that we can….

Rosen: There’s a political concern that if the Republicans stand their ground on this [repealing Obamacare], they are going to be blamed for shutting down the government.

Gardner: Well, I think if the government gets shut down, it’s going to be the President’s decision to do so. I believe that we don’t need to shut down the government because we ought to just lift this health-care bill out of the way and let America work. [BigMedia emphasis]

If that’s a warning “against requiring Democrats to defund the Affordable Care Act as a requirement for keeping government open,” then mushrooms aren’t popping up in our mountains right now (and they are).

Next time Gardner’s Siciliano tells me something, if I’m a reporter, I think I go the extra mile to make sure it’s accurate.

Coffman’s fact-free attack on a judge deserves media scrutiny

Wednesday, August 6th, 2014

In a blog post about a week ago, I gave conservative talk-radio host Hugh Hewitt some unsolicited information on why Rep. Mike Coffman is still so upset at losing his conservative district and now being a square peg in the round hole of Aurora.

Coffman told Hewitt that Democrats had “targeted my seat in the redistricting process.”

“A Democratic judge – you know, certainly his affiliation, I’m sure, — in Denver signed off on their map, without any amendments, and it certainly is what they call a ‘D+1’ [‘D’ plus one] district.”

An astute reader informed me that, in fact, judge Robert S. Hyatt is an unaffiliated voter, and likely has been since 1979, according to public records.

I checked this out myself, and confirmed it, with a high degree but not complete certainty, as I was unable to reach the retired judge himself–and he likely wouldn’t have divulged this information anyway.

As my correspondent pointed out, Coffman’s reckless — and fact-less — attack on the independence of the judiciary deserves scrutiny by reporters, particularly in light of Coffman’s oath to defend the U.S. Constitution.

As a progressive, I can tell you that Hyatt is no friend of progressive causes over conservative ones, as a brief examination of Hyatt’s decisions makes obvious. Remember, he ruled in favor of conservatives just last year in a case clearing the way for the recall of two Democratic state senators.

CO Republican Party Vice Chair Calls for Investigation into Tancredo Attacks

Friday, August 1st, 2014

On KLZ’s nooner show Aug. 29, Freedom 560, Colorado Republican Party Vice Chairman Mark Baisley announced his support for an investigation into the Republican Governors Association’s involvement (via the Republican Attorneys General Association) in attack ads against gubernatorial candidate Tom Tancredo.

Ken Clark: Quite frankly, you’re right about one thing. And that is simply that it was — Who was it? It was the CREW folks that actually did dig this up — and yes they’re left leaning and yes, and they did leak this information to Lynn Bartels. However, there is one problem with all that. It’s true!!!
o It is true!
Clark: Yeah! The RGA got involved, the RGA, the establishment Republicans, the national establishment got involved in our election here in Colorado, manipulated it, and lied — flat out lied against Tom Tancredo. Now, did Bob Beauprez know this was happening? I doubt it. In this article that Lynn wrote, she claims that — or Ryan [Call] claims that he had no idea it was going on. Frankly, I don’t buy that, because right before the election, Ryan Call was putting out propaganda from the Party that used all of Bob Beauprez’s lingo on how he described himself. So, I’m having trouble with the idea that Ryan Call just didn’t know this was going on. Sorry, but he’s the chairman of the state Party
Baisley: Okay, and I don’t know the answer to that. Chairman Call and I have not spoken on this topic. And so, I’ll reach out to him today. But, regardless, the RGA has done something that is just wrong. And they obviously know that it’s wrong, because they took such great pains to hide their actions. And we need to come against them very strongly. So, I’m calling for the Republican Party in Colorado to stand up to the national influences and say, “Look, you SOBs! This is our state! We’re Western culture. We think rather independently. Stay the hell out of our world, here!” And let’s even– let’s have a local investigation. Let’s have the state Party denounce that kind of involvement and let us just do what we do best, get out the vote for our nominee, and go beat the Democrats. But stay out of our world! And yeah, even if there’s an investigation that needs to be done to bring out what were the dominoes that led us to this point, that would be great, too. I’d be all for that. [BigMedia emphasis.]
Clark: Well, yeah, because I agree with you, Mark. And you know what? I am very, very pleased to hear you come out so forcefully and strongly, and stand up and actually make the call for an inviestigation into this matter. Mark, I think that is huge. That’s the kind of leadership we’re looking for. Now, there’s a mealy mouthed press release we got from Beauprez. It really didn’t go that far. And I understand he is the candidate, but at the same time, if he didn’t know that these guys were doing this– and you’re absolutely right, Mark, they were doing everything they could to hide those dollars.

Listen to Mark Baisley on KLZ FREEDOM560 7.29.14

 

Filling in the talk-radio blanks on why Coffman is still upset at being a square-peg in the round-hole of Aurora

Friday, July 25th, 2014

If you follow the 6th Congressional District race, Coffman vs. Romanoff, you know that everything we’re seeing, from Coffman’s attempts to re-invent himself (abortion, immigration) to Romanoff’s decision to run at all, goes back to the 2010 redistricting, which turned the seat from red to purple.

From day one after the new district was created, reporters referenced the question of whether, when it comes to his new district, Coffman is a square peg in a round hole, a bad fit, even a Cuckoo bird* (my friend’s analogy). The election will answer this question.

But whether you think Coffman is anything like a Cuckoo bird, you wouldn’t expect Coffman, three years after redistricting, to be bringing up the square-peg issue himself, almost hating on his own district.

As Coffman said on the Hugh Hewitt show last week:

Coffman: Well, what they did, is they targeted my seat in the redistricting process. A Democratic judge – you know, certainly his affiliation, I’m sure, — in Denver, signed off on their map, without any amendments, and it certainly is what they call a ‘D+1’ [‘D’ plus one] district. So, it’s a Democrat-leaning district. Obama carried it by five points last time. I’m the number-one target for any sitting House Republican by the Democratic Campaign Congressional Committee.  And I’m proud of it. I need the support of all the folks out there who seeks to return to a constitutional government to the United States.

Listen to Coffman’s thoughts on redistricting on Hugh Hewitt 7.18.14

Hewitt doesn’t know enough about Colorado politics to be expected to correct some of Coffman’s facts here, so I’ll fill in for him.

First, there’s the politics. I read this as Coffman admitting that he’s not right for his own district. He’s pissed at Democrats for targeting his seat, and he’s mad at the “Democratic judge” for approving it. Yet, he wants to be the representative. Fine, but how far will he go (and can he go) not to be the square peg? That’s the heart of the matter out there in Aurora.

With respect to the facts (or lack thereof), Coffman’s claim that the judge was a biased Democrat is completely baseless and, honestly, makes Coffman look sour-grapes-desperate. Aside from the fact that Judge Robert Hyatt had no choice but to accept one of the proposed maps in toto, without amendments, Hyatt is widely respected and has shown it over the years.

As The Denver Post’s Lynn Bartels, wrote just before his redistricting ruling:

The Denver judge who will draw new boundaries for Colorado’s seven congressional districts already has shaped the state’s political landscape with rulings cheered and jeered by Republicans and Democrats alike.

Judge Robert Hyatt in June threw out a lawsuit from retirees who argued the state legislature had no right to reduce benefits from the Public Employees Retirement Association.

He kicked Marc Holtzman off the ballot in 2006, ruling the Republican didn’t collect enough petition signatures as required by law. That paved the way for Bob Beauprez to wrap up the GOP nomination for governor.

I’ve written a lot about media coverage of this race, but I’d forgotten just how red Coffman’s old district was at 46 percent Republican, 26 percent Democrat, and 28 independent. That’s why Trancredo happily held it before Coffman.

Before redistricting, Coffman was like a shade-loving potted plant, happy in his place under a Cottonwood tree. Then the Cottonwood tree blew down, and suddenly sunlight started streaming onto Coffman, and he has to become sun-loving or die. That’s a tough adjustment, and most plants can’t handle it.

That’s kind of stupid, but it illustrates the underlying dynamic that should inform reporting on the race.

*the Cuckoo bird lays its eggs in another bird’s nest, dumps out the other bird’s eggs, and leaves the other bird to sit on them and raise the babies. They’re imposter babies, hoping that they don’t get recognized as being nothing like the real babies.

What’s up with Gardner wanting public postings of the Ten Commandments?

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014

Why are the 10 Commandments so attractive to conservatives that talk-radio host Hugh Hewitt doesn’t blink an eye when gubernatorial candidate Bob Beauprez says we should “go back” to the 10 Commandments to restore “some order in society.”

Beauprez: “That’s why God gave Moses those 10 Commandments, wasn’t it, to keep some order in society. And I think that’s what we’ve got to go back to.”

Beauprez brought up the Commandments as part of his solution to the immigration tragedy along the border.

If I were Hewitt, I’d have asked how not coveting they neighbor’s wife, not using the lord’s name in vain, and not being an atheist would help the teenage migrants.

Worse is the free pass from real reporters that a candidate for U.S. Senate, Rep. Cory Gardner, gets for his support of “public posting the 10 Commandments.”

It’s one thing for Beauprez to push moral fortitude via the Commandments; it’s another for Gardner to endorse state sponsorship of religious material.
g
Where does Gardner want such postings? Courts? Schools? DMV? He deserves to be asked.

https://soundcloud.com/bigmedia-org/hewitt-doesnt-challenge-beauprez-on-his-longing-for-10-commandments-071614

Media omission: Beauprez says 47-percent comment was a lament and “consumption tax” would be more fair

Wednesday, July 9th, 2014

In what appears to be his first non-spokesperson explanation in the media of his comment that “we’ve got almost half the population perfectly happy that somebody else is paying” income tax, Beauprez said on a Colorado Springs radio show Saturday that in his 2010 Rotary-Club speech, he was “lamenting” that more people couldn’t be like Beauprez’s father, who fought his way out of poverty, when he paid no income tax, and later made enough money to achieve “some degree of success and prosperity” and  to pay “part of the load to carry this state and this great nation.”

Beauprez went on to suggest that it would be more fair to throw out the current income tax code and replace it with a consumption tax.

“I think taxing consumption is a whole lot better idea than taxing work, or the income from work,” Beauprez told KVOR host Ed Jones July 5. “And I think it is more equitable and more fair. So yeah, I think we ought to move that direction. I wrote a book, published in 2009, and I said we ought to take the entire tax code –the whole thing– light it on fire and start all over. And if we start over with that kind of a tax system, I think we’d be far better off and really stimulate this economy.

Jones, substituting for regular host Jeff Crank, did not ask Beauprez how his father’s story squares with Beauprez’s comment that almost half the population is “perfectly happy” not to pay tax. Judging from Beauprez’s story, Beauprez’s father didn’t seem happy at all not to pay income tax, much less perfectly happy.

Neither did Jones ask Romney for details on how his proposed consumption tax, typically applied to the sale goods and services.

HOST ED JONES: Let me go back to something, and–Goll–Governor, again, you are so right! Now, the Dems have come out with this ad on this Rotary Club speech you made four years ago about the 47 percent, [chuckles] – and you were right! And you’re still right!
GOP GUBERNATORIAL CANDIDATE BOB BEAUPREZ: Well, I was right. Forty-seven percent of folks don’t pay income tax.
JONES: That’s right.
BEAUPREZ: I want to make sure people understand that – income tax. And what I was lamenting in that, Ed, is not that some do and some don’t.
JONES: Yeah.
BEAUPREZ: What I was harkening back to was a lesson, again, taught to me by my folks
JONES: Yeah.
BEAUPREZ: They went through a period of time when they were so poor that they—not only they didn’t owe any taxes, if they did, they wouldn’t have had any cash to pay it. But what brought it to mind, was I overheard them talking about what their tax bill was going to be, and it seemed like a lot of money at the time, and so I said something, “Wow! That seems like a lot!” My dad took that as an opportunity to point out to me, he said, “Bob, This–we’ve been there before. We were so poor we didn’t—and troubled, during dry years on the farm, we didn’t owe any taxes,“ he said. “I don’t ever want to go there again.”
JONES: Mmm-hmm.
BEAUPREZ: And he took it as a sign that not only they had achieved some degree of success and prosperity, but they were paying a part of the load to carry this state and this great nation. And he was proud of that fact. What I was lamenting in those comments I made, was that more people don’t have that opportunity for something Arthur Brooks at AEI calls ‘earned success’.
JONES: Yes. Uh-huh.
BEAUPREZ: And I think that’s always something that has identified certainly this great state and this great nation, is the opportunity to earn a piece of that American Dream and make your mark.
JONES: Mm-hmm.
BEAUPREZ: That’s my frustration, is we’re now about 250,000 jobs short of where we normally would be in Colorado.
JONES: Right.
BEAUPREZ: A lot of the jobs that have been created are entry level jobs. So we’ve got to get to the point again where we’re really a society, a state, a culture, where big dreams can happen. Not just “a” job, but a real career opportunity and the kind of opportunity that’s always been a part of Colorado.
HOST JIMMY BENSBERG: Well, Bob we’ve got a fellow on the line who is familiar with providing jobs right here in Colorado Springs. Let’s see if we can get him on the line, here, it’s Ed Bircham. Ed, welcome to the show.
ED BIRCHAM: Yeah, good morning! You guys [are] doing a great job and a great get-together at the headquarters the other day [referring to the GOP unity tour passing through El Paso County]. And Mr. Beauprez, as a businessman myself, [a] successful immigrant from England, here’s my problem with people like [“Socialist”] Steve [a regular listener and caller to the Jeff Crank Show] calling in. Steve would have you believe that the only people who have and money is Republicans. But, look, we’ve got Buffett. We’ve got Gates. We’ve got Soros. So, get out off this kick of ‘just the rich people are Republicans’. What Steve doesn’t understand, Governor – and I’m calling you Governor because you will be, and you’ve got a great Lieutenant Governor [Jill Repella], I was very impressed with her the other day. But my point to Steve is corporations hire people. And your question about the forty-three or forty-seven percent, the only way we’re going to get these people, in my opinon, is we’ve got to go to a flat tax, a consumer tax, get rid of the IRS. And if you’re going to live in this great country, you have to pay something, Governor! Wouldn’t you agree that we just can’t have this number of people –we can take care of the poor people. We have a way to do that. But we just can’t have people not paying something. Do you agree with that?
BEAUPREZ: Yeah, in fact, when I was in Congress, I did endorse a –the consumer –the consumption tax, typically called the Fair Tax idea. John Lenders was the sponsor of it. He sat next to me on Ways and Means [Committee], and we had a whole lot of discussions about it, and I think taxing consumption is a whole lot better idea than taxing work, or the income from work. And I think it is more equitable and more fair. So yeah, I think we ought to move that direction. I wrote a book, published in 2009, and I said we ought to take the entire tax code –the whole thing– light it on fire and start all over. And if we start over with that kind of a tax system, I think we’d be far better off and really stimulate this economy.



LISTEN: https://soundcloud.com/bigmedia-org/clip-47percent-beauprezcrank7514-0001

Media omission: Beauprez favors Arizona-style action on immigration, if feds don’t act

Tuesday, July 8th, 2014

In wide-ranging thoughts on immigration policy delivered over the weekend on a Denver radio station, Colorado gubernatorial candidate Bob Beauprez said states should enforce federal immigration law themselves, in the absence of federal action, “as Jan Brewer tried to do in Arizona.”

The Arizona law, backed by Brewer, allowing police to detain anyone suspected of being an illegal immigrant, was ruled unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court. It’s widely believed that the law would have led to harassment and discrimination of legal and undocumented immigrants.

Beauprez said that before he’d take immigration matters in his own hands if elected governor, he’d join with other governors and sue the federal government to “secure our borders.”

Beauprez made the comments on KOA 850-AM, a Denver radio station, Saturday in response to a question from guest radio host Doug Kellet, who asked Beauprez about the young undocumented immigrants captured recently along the U.S.-Mexico border.

“I was with a group of people the day before yesterday, and several of them were from our southern cities, Pueblo specifically,” said Beauprez on air. “And they said, if buses show up, they will be in the streets to block them. I think you are going to see what happened in California start happening everywhere.”

Beauprez also said: “It’s going to affect all the states out here, and the President is trying to gloss over it and tell us all the wonderful things we’re doing as a nation to accept all these people. He doesn’t tell us the impact on the people who are already here and are going to pay the bill.”

Kellet didn’t ask Beauprez if he’d participate in the street protests himself.

On another radio show Sunday, Beauprez outlined an immigration system he’d back.

“We need to secure the border,” Beauprez told KVOR guest hosts Ed Jones and Jimmy Bensberg Saturday. “We need a modern, 21st century legal immigration system, where folks that want here can apply for it. They can get an answer in short order. We can get the kind of help we need and enforce the rule of law. So employers have a system, that they can live within the rules. And people know that if somebody is here illegally, they’re going to be found and sent home.”

The hosts didn’t ask Beauprez if he’s favor sending all undocumented immigrants currently in the U.S. back to their countries of origin.

https://soundcloud.com/bigmedia-org/on-radio-beauprez-promises-to-take-arizona-like-action-if-feds-dont-act-on-immigration-7-5-14

Partial transcript of Beauprez’s comments on KOA July 5

Kellet: I want to talk to you about immigration, because on this July 4th weekend we have a serious problem on our southwest border, and it certainly could affect Colorado.

Beauprez: It sure can. It’s going to affect all the states out here, and the President is trying to gloss over it and tell us all the wonderful things we’re doing as a nation to accept all these people. He doesn’t tell us the impact on the people who are already here and are going to pay the bill.

Kellet: Well, I keep on wondering what’s going to happen here, sir…

Beauprez: I was with a group of people the day before yesterday, and several of them were from our southern cities, Pueblo specifically, and they said, if buses show up, they will be in the streets to block them. I think you are going to see what happened in California start happening everywhere. Governors on behalf of their states are going to have to be very vocal, very strong, and push back on DC…. You have to face the reality that this is going to be another straw on the back that will fiscally impact states in a big way. It will culturally impact states in a big way. When you don’t enforce the rule of law, and this is the bottom line, Doug, chaos breaks out. And this is an example of chaos breaking out…Governors ought to be telling the federal government, do your job, secure our borders, stop this kind of action, send these people back home… They are not political refugees. This is just wrong. Governors ought to be, first of all, demanding it, and then secondly, if the federal government doesn’t do it, then sue them and get an injunction against the federal government and force them to do their job in court. This is a responsibility of the federal government. And if they won’t do it, states ought to be allowed to do it, as Jan Brewer tried to do in Arizona.

KOA’s Mike Rosen says he’d be “fair” if he moderated a Hickenlooper-Beauprez debate

Friday, July 4th, 2014

CORRECTION: This post incorrectly states that most journalists consider themselves Democrats. Over half of journalists in a recent survey self-identify as having no party affiliation. About 7 percent said they were Republicans, and 28 percent Democrats. My point about Rosen is unchanged.

From: Jason Salzman
To: [KOA Radio Host] Mike Rosen
Subject: question for my blog

Hi Mike – I hope all’s well.

I noticed you told Bob Beauprez the other day that you’re hoping to moderate a debate between him and Hick.

You said, “By the way, even though I’m a partisan Republican, I’ve moderated these debates before, and I can set that aside and be fair in a head-to-head debate.”

How does this square with your belief that journalism is biased toward the Democrats because more reporters are registered Dems? Thanks for considering a response.

From: Mike Rosen
To: Jason Subject:
RE: question for my blog

Moderating a debate is different from reporting. I’m not a reporter. I admit my bias when doing commentary and set it aside when I moderate a debate. Too many liberal “reporters” don’t admit their bias (some may not even recognize it) but infuse it either intentionally or unintentionally in their news stories or so-called analysis.

From: Jason Salzman
To: Mike Rosen Subject:
RE: question for my blog

Thanks. A moderator of a debate tries to be fair, just like a reporter does. Why can’t a reporter, who is a registered Democrat, also set aside his or her bias, like a moderator of a debate?

Are you saying that if reporters were to state party affiliation in public, like you do, then they would be more likely to be fair?

From: Mike Rosen
To: Jason Salzman Subject:
RE: question for my blog

No, I’m not saying that stating one’s party affiliation would make them more likely to be fair. Certainly, a reporter can be fair in a news story. Some are. Too many aren’t. They either don’t try or do try and fail. We’re all subject to our perspectives formed by our perceptions, our values, our ideology, our knowledge or our ignorance.

The dominant liberal culture in newspapers like the NY Times, magazines like Time or broadcast media like NBC CBS, CNN, NPR, or PBS cultivates liberal bias in their editing and reporting. Some of those liberals don’t think of themselves as liberals, others are consciously engaged in advocacy journalism in order to affect policy as they see it. (That’s OK for opinion journalists but not for reporters claiming fairness). There’s a conservative culture at FOX, but its audience is a small fraction of the others.

I’m not opposed to civil unions or same-sex marriage but I can observe that The Denver Post doesn’t just report on it but cheerleads for it on its news pages. The theory that human activity is a dominant cause of global warming is another widespread example of liberal advocacy journalism from news organs. The science isn’t “settled.” Science never is.

That’s an actual exchange from last week between me and Rosen, in case you were wondering if it were real. Bottom line for Rosen seems to be that newsrooms need more Mike Rosens, or at least more conservatives. But this might not do the trick either.

Rosen has Hick and Denver Mayor Michael Hancock on his show every month, and he’s reasonable with them, as he’s been with other Dems over the years. Hence, they keep coming back on his show.

But a lot is at stake in a debate, an you wonder, given what Rosen wrote above, would Rosen-the-Moderator ask about same-sex marriage at all?

If Rosen-the-Moderator were in charge, and Beauprez said, as he wrote in his book, that climate change is “at best a grossly overhyped issue and at worst a complete hoax foisted on most of the world,” would Rosen challenge him, like an professional-journalist moderator, and ask for his evidence that climate change could possibly be a complete hoax?

I don’t think so.

No evidence to support talk-radio accusation that Obama is dumping undocumented immigrants in Arizona for political revenge

Thursday, July 3rd, 2014

Undocumented children are literally dying along the U.S. border, in the desert, and radio-host Mike Rosen and gubernatorial candidate Bob Beauprez are accusing Obama of dumping undocumented kids in Arizona, as a form of political revenge against Arizona governor Jan Brewer:

ROSEN: You suppose that there could be any spiteful motivations on President Obama’s part for dumping a lot of those unaccompanied—

BEAUPREZ: (sarcastically) Surely not. You’re not that cynical, are you?

ROSEN: — teenage immigrants into the state of Arizona because he doesn’t like [Republican Governor] Jan Brewer?

BEAUPREZ: [laughing loudly] Yeah, it’s perhaps more than coincidental.

ROSEN: Hmmmm. Hmmm

It’s moments like this when you wish SuperTalker from above would float into the KOA studios, bop Rosen on the head, and say, “Shut up, Mike. And you, Bob, want to be governor? What kind of governor makes ugly and bizarre accusations, like this, based on no evidence at all. And you’re laughing about it, at the expense of the poorest, most vulnerable kids? It doesn’t get much worse.”

Then SuperTalker would tell KOA listeners that he’s placed Rosen in timeout for a few days and asked him to think about whether it would be right, on any planet, to say such things, as kids are caught in the immigration nightmare that we’ve created.

Here’s the story, as told by the Associated Press, of an 11-year-old Guatemalan boy, Gilberto Ramos, whose decomposing body was found in Texas.

He was born and grew up in San Jose Las Flores in a modest wood and sheet-metal home in the Cuchumatanes mountains of Huehuetenango province along the Mexico border. At 6,600 feet above sea level, the exuberant beauty of peaks and canyons are in stark contrast to the extreme poverty. There is no running or potable water and only a latrine. There is food, tortillas or wheat atole, an oatmeal-like drink, but never enough.

The cluster of homes where Gilberto lived is accessible only by foot along a rocky and often muddy mile-long path, which took 45 minutes in the canyons and mud to traverse on Tuesday. Gilberto walked that path each way to school, where he went as far as third grade before dropping out…

Short, quiet and humble, he stayed close to home. But he grew despairing and bored, Esbin Ramos said. Their mother grew sicker. The older brother suggested Gilberto come to Chicago, where he could return to school and work at night and on weekends.

So while children like Gilberto (but who survive) are being caught along the border, the Obama Administration is trying to deal with the situation humanely, by sending them to immigration courts different states, obviously not just Jan Brewer’s Arizona. Obama is trying to work with Congress, because doing nothing isn’t an option.

And this is what we get on talk radio?

Let’s hope Rosen, who’s actually more thoughtful than some of his talk-radio colleagues, didn’t think through just how sad it all is.

https://soundcloud.com/bigmedia-org/beauprez-says-obama-dumps-immigrant-kids-in-arizona-for-political-revenge

Reporters should investigate Beauprez’s complete denial of Both-Ways-Bob accusation

Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014

Last month, The Denver Post ran a strange quote from GOP gubernatorial candidate Bob Beauprez:

“I’ve never been accused of switching positions on a vote or an issue. But that happens in politics.”

I wondered about the wisdom of running such a quote, given that it was almost certainly a slip of the tongue by Beauprez, who’s been called Both Ways Bob countless times by Democrats and Republicans alike.

But then last week, on KOA’s Mike Rosen show, Beauprez repeated essentially the same thing. Rosen asked Beauprez how he’d respond to the Both-Ways-Bob moniker, and here’s how he replied:

Beauprez: Well, you know, Mike, one thing that the record is actually pretty clear about is that I’ve never been called unprincipled, or wavering, or with a flimsy spine. Quite the opposite. I think most people understand that I know who I am.

Listen to Beauprez deny Both Ways Bob accusation–on KOA radio 06-26-2014

You have to be thick-skinned to survive in politics but to completely deny the existence of a common accusation against you is so weird that it merits further investigation by reporters.

Here’s a transcript of the exchange between Rosen and Beauprez:

Rosen: In an earlier race…during the campaign for the Republican nomination, Marc Holtzman, or his campaign geniuses had crafted the slogan ‘Both Ways Bob”  and in so doing, they were trying to paint you as somebody who had flip flopped on some issues. I hate that kind of tactic in any kind of Republican primary because it can come back to haunt us. Well, guess what? Some progressive sites right now, and progressive is the fashionable word for radically left wing, even to the left of liberals, are using Both Ways Bob to attack you in this campaign against Gov. Hickenlooper. How are you going to answer that?

Beauprez: Well, Mike, one thing that the record is pretty clear about is that I’ve never been called unprincipled, or wavering, or with a flimsy spine. Quite the opposite. I think most people understand that I know who I am.

Listen to Beauprez deny Both Ways Bob accusation–on KOA radio 06-26-2014