Archive for the 'Talk Radio' Category

After Cantor’s fall, who’s the tea-partiest of them all? Talk radio tries to find the answer

Friday, June 13th, 2014

After House Majority Leader Eric Cantor’s crash, you naturally wonder which Republicans in Colorado’s gubernatorial primary are out-of-the-closet tea partiers. Arguably, they’re all closeted tea party types, at a minimum, but who lets his tea-party flag fly?

Colorado’s gubernatorial race has been spotlighted nationally as the next big test of tea-party strength, post Eric Cantor. So Republican voters may want to know which of the leading candidates self-identify as tea party.

Local talk-radio hosts have been out in front on this story.

In the past, despite his tea-party record, Bob Beauprez has ducked the question in different ways. In one instance, on KOA’s Mike Rosen show, he said:

Caller Doug: My question for Rep Beauprez: Is he more aligned with the traditional Republican Party or more aligned with the tea p?

Beauprez: I’m more aligned with, some people would call them, conservative values, traditional values. I think both of the groups that you highlight, in general, adhere to the same.

On the other hand, Tom Tancredo told KNUS’ Steve Kelley Wednesday:

Tancredo: I love the tea party. I believe they have been a very healthy force inside this body politic, especially for Republicans. I believe it has helped move the party to the right, although it’s been done begrudgingly on the part the party itself. A lot of people resent it and resist it. No, I think they’ve been helpful.

Listen to Tancredo discusses the tea party on KNUS Kelley and Company 06-11-14

Will talk radio boost Tancredo as it did Cantor’s tea-party opponent?

Friday, June 13th, 2014

I’ve been too busy listening to talk radio to notice news reports that talk radio anchored the defeat of GOP House Majority Leader Eric Cantor. Politico reported Wednesday:

Brat’s surprise victory is a powerful reminder, as if any were needed, of the immense influence talk radio has over conservative politics — it was not only [Laura Ingraham] boosting [Cantor slayer David Brat] but also Glenn Beck and Mark Levin bringing their considerable influence with the right to bear as well. Since well before the rise of the tea party, establishment Republicans have feared the medium’s command over the conservative base.

National talk-radio hosts not only endorsed Brat, but had him on their radio shows, broadcast in Virginia, numerous times leading up to his primary victory, according to Politico.

Will these national yappers now take aim at Colorado, possibly boosting Tom Tancredo over his more establishment rivals? So far I haven’t seen Laura Ingraham, broadcast locally on KLZ 560-AM, or Mark Levin, on KNUS 710-AM, getting involved in our gubernatorial primary, and I have no idea of their GOP audience compares to Virginia’s. Closest thing was Michelle Malkin’s battle-cry tweet after Cantor’s loss, saying Colorado is next.

But if anyone hears anything about Tanc from Ingraham, Levin, et al. please let me know.

In Virginia, it looks like Ingraham in particular took a high profile stance for Brat, as reported by Politico.

“She wasn’t just a talk radio host who simply used her program to promote Brat. She took it to another level,” said Chuck Todd, the NBC News political director and senior White House correspondent. “I think she does deserve credit in giving credibility to Brat.”

Of the local radio hosts, KNUS’ Peter Boyles is certainly doing his best for his buddy Tancredo, but god knows if Boyles does anything in the real world but excite electrons.

Colorado Springs talker Jimmy Lakey, who was once a Republican congressional candidate for CD 7 and doubles as Tancredo’s press secretary, posted his ballot on his Facebook page, with “Tancredo” bubble filled in. See below.

So maybe a groundswell of hot air will lift Tancredo over the top?

This post was updated to reflect that fact that KVOR’s Jimmy Lakey is also Tancredo’s press secretary.

Still waiting for an article quoting Beauprez on why he flipped on the individual mandate

Monday, June 2nd, 2014

The primary season has illuminated some big flipping and flopping by Republican candidates, leaving lingering questions in the minds of the three people following this stuff.

One of the strangest unanswered questions is: Why did gubernatorial candidate Bob Beauprez first support and then oppose the “individual mandate,” which is, of course, the key provision of Romneycare and Obamacare? It requires everyone to get health insurance.

The issue came up in April on KVOR’s Jeff Crank show. Crank is an anti-Obamacare freak, so even if he knew about Beauprez’s flip, you wouldn’t expect Crank to tell his listeners that Beauprez was once a fan of the foundation of Obamacare:

BEAUPREZ: To Obamacare, specifically, Jeff, count me in the camp that says we still need to repeal it and replace it. But I’m also realistic enough to know that that’s not likely to happen, even if we do take over control of the United States Senate, we’ll still have Barack Obama there and I doubt he’s inclined to repeal the whole bill – to sign off on that. So, we’re probably a couple years away with a new president before we can get it done. What we can do, and what I look forward to doing, is everything within a governor’s power and the state’s power to push back, especially on this Medicaid bomb that is coming our way. We are going to have to stand firm on that because it is going to break the states. We’ll be going down the path of the Californias and the city of Detroit if we’re not careful and get our arms around this. I think the real push can come from a collaboration of governors. And I look forward to working with many of them that I already know out here: Butch Otter, I served with—he’s in Idaho; Gary Herbert in Utah; Matt Meade, a great guy in Wyoming; Susana Martinez; Mary Fallon, and on and on. Bobby Jindal’s been an absolute champion, just out with his own new healthcare plan that talks about a real healthcare reform—what it would look like. And not surprisingly, he expands on free-market principles: HSAs, more consumer choice, putting decisions in the hands of consumers, not just pushing tens of millions of people on to traditional Medicaid, as he puts it.

Even if the GOP fire against Obamacare is dying, you’d think reporters would do Republican voters a favor and seek an explanation from Beauprez on how he went from point a) praising Romneycare and saying a mandate buy health insurance is like a law requiring you to buy auto insurance to point b) denouncing Obamacare, saying we need “more consumer choice,” and essentially leaving the poor to scrap for healthcare. What’s the evolution of Beauprez’s thinking here?

If this isn’t information that a Republican primary voter would want to hear in 2014, what is?

https://soundcloud.com/bigmedia-org/beauprez-denounces-obamacare-on-jeff-crank-show-4514

Talk-radio host’s hate rant on Michael Sam

Friday, May 9th, 2014

With apologies to the film Steel Magnolias, starring Shirley MacClaine and Olympia Dukakis, here’s a rant by a Colorado Springs’ talk-radio host against Michael Sam, the first openly gay man to (hopefully) be drafted into the National Football League.

The audio of the rant, by KVOR’s Richard Randall, is overlaid on a segment of the 1989 movie.

WARNING: This video clip shows bare asses in a locker room, which are a big problem for Randall.

Colorado progressive talk radio hits bottom with cancellation of Gloria Neal show

Thursday, May 8th, 2014

There’s endless speculation about why progressive talk shows repeatedly fail on commercial radio, and the latest to go down is Gloria Neal’s morning show on KKZN AM-760, Colorado’s Progressive Talk.

Greg Foster, vice president/programming for Clear Channel, which owns the station, told The Denver Post’s Joanne Ostrow yesterday:

“I can confirm that Gloria Neal’s show is no longer on KKZN and she is no longer with our company. We will be announcing new programming for KKZN in the near future.”

I didn’t listen to Neal much, but I liked her. And more than her, I liked the fact that her show existed, in the conservative-infested radio air waves of Colorado. (A few public stations around the state, like Boulder’s KGNU, air left-leaning talkers.)

Neal took over the show a couple years ago from David Sirota, who tweeted yesterday that he had solid ratings when he was there.

But progressive talk radio has been headed down hill since the hopeful days of Air America and Al Franken, and here in Colorado, it’s hit the bottom now, where it will probably remain.

Why do conservatives dominate the political talk-radio medium? Its base audience is old white men who are turned off by professional journalism and find an affirming, like-minded community on the airwaves. Conservative corporations, like Clear Channel and Salem, have a cheap (increasingly syndicated) formula for offering delivering conservative content. Bingo.

On talk radio, Lamborn’s challenger explains why he decided to run

Tuesday, April 29th, 2014

Progressives who read this blog would be excused for wondering, how could anyone find Rep. Doug Lamborn to be insufficiently tilted rightward? So much so that he should be thrown out?

We can thank KVOR’s Jeff Crank Show for broadcasting the answer, at least according to the guy who wants Lamborn’s job.

Major General Bentley Rayburn, who is challenging Lamborn in the GOP congressional primary in Colorado Springs (CD 5), told Crank on Saturday why he’s running:

Rayburn: You know, the thing that pushed me over the side [into the race]– it was kind of funny, because it was the ‘white board incident’ at the Air Force Academy. [Read about it here.] And the fact that this young man, or woman – I think it was a fellow, wrote a bible verse (Gallatians 2:20) on his whiteboard, just a board mounted outside his room. And it was just a statement of his faith. And yet, within nanoseconds, somebody is complaining about it. It gets to our buddy Mikey Weinstein, who’s been a nemesis of the Academy for a decade. And within, you know, two hours – whether the cadet erased it himself or had it erased is really irrelevant. It was erased.

And in all of this, Doug [Lamborn]– people don’t understand this. Doug has a special relationship with the Academy because he sits on the Board of Visitors. That would be like the Board of Regents for the CU system. And so he’s not only the local rep. He sits on the policy board. Every accredited institution has to have an independent policy board. And he has never spoken forcefully about the religious freedom issues at the United States Air Force Academy, and so many of the other important issues that the school faces.

And I want somebody – not only with the other things, the spending out of control, and everything else. But we have a jewel here in the United States Air Force Academy, and if we’re not going to stand up and make sure that we’re producing the kind of officers that we need – one, who are not offended at the slightest little thing that crosses their path, and two, that know what they believe and have the backbone to stand up for what they believe, then I’m not sure we really need an Air Force Academy or any other academies. But we’ve got to have somebody stand up for the schools, and we are not getting it from Doug Lamborn. He’ll write a letter. [Lamborn issued a letter in support of religion at the Academy.]

At least when Putin invades Crimea, at least Obama writes a strongly-worded letter. But we need somebody that will demonstrate real leadership. And that just happened to be the proverbial straw. Had somebody else stepped up [to run against Lamborn], fine. But that’s what drove me over the edge and made me consider running in the first place.

On radio, with facts absent, Cynthia Coffman attacks Quick for saying he won’t defend CO gay-marriage ban

Friday, April 25th, 2014

KVOR guest host Jimmy Bensberg talked last weekwith Cynthia Coffman, who’s running for Colorado Attorney General.

CYNTHIA COFFMAN: Taking a page from U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder’s playbook, [Democratic AG candidate Don] Quick held a press conference on the steps of state courts building and called on John Suthers to drop his defense of the definition of marriage – BENSBERG: Ugh! COFFMAN: –that’s in the Constitution of Colorado. You know the voters, a number of years back, amended the Constitution and said we want marriage to be the traditional definition of being between a man and a woman. That’s what the voters approved, and Don Quick says he doesn’t agree with that. He doesn’t believe that that is constitutional, even though the Supreme Court of the United States hasn’t said that. And so presumptively, he thinks that the Attorney General should not defend that provision of the Constitution. And you know, that kind of picking and choosing as an Attorney General, what parts of the Constitution you defend, I can’t imagine a better thing to criticize my opponent about, than starting there.

Left out of this loving, tolerant, and legally ignorant conversation is the fact that Suthers’ proactive defense of the federal “Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA),” which was filed in the name of protecting Colorado’s gay-marriage ban, was actually an attack on gay couples who wanted to be buried together in military cemeteries or to get spousal benefits under Medicaid, etc. Suthers’ DOMA action looked like a wrong legal tactic, from the perpective of protecting Colorado’s Constitutional amendment. But more broadly, and to the heart of the matter, you want an Attorney General who will make public-minded decisions about what makes constitutional sense, regardless of the politics involved. In the case of defending Colorado’s anti-gay-marriage amendment, Suthers could have decided, as six other state Attorneys General did, that it’s a wrong legal move. Despite what Cynthia Coffman says, nothing forces Suthers to take action. Here’s what the Attorney General Eric Holder told the New York Times:

But Mr. Holder said when laws touch on core constitutional issues like equal protection, an attorney general should apply the highest level of scrutiny before reaching a decision on whether to defend it. He said the decision should never be political or based on policy objections. “Engaging in that process and making that determination is something that’s appropriate for an attorney general to do,” Mr. Holder said. As an example, Mr. Holder cited the landmark Brown v. Board of Education case, which forced public school integration in 1954.

Don’t forget Nugent called Colorado the “poster child” of “moral dereliction”

Friday, March 28th, 2014

I wrote a blog post a while back regurgitating rocker Ted Nugent’s appearance on KNUS Peter Boyles’ show, where Nugent said Colorado is the poster child of “moral dereliction” and the Republican Party has “no balls” because someone cut off “their scrotum with a rusty shiv.”

Exciting stuff that logged me 50,000 listens on SoundCloud.

The thing is, Nugent, who also called Obama a “subhuman mongrel,” is featured in at least three fundraising appeals for GOP gubernatorial candidate Tom Tancredo.

A couple weeks ago, Denver Post reporter Lynn Bartels asked Tancredo about his association with Nugent:

“Every time somebody asks me about it, I always say, ‘The thing about Ted Nugent that I like is he has given me the ability to say something that I have hardly ever before uttered in my life and that is the following — ‘” Tancredo said, but couldn’t finish his sentence he was laughing so hard.

“He has given me the ability to say, ‘I wouldn’t go that far,’” Tancredo said, cracking up.

After he calmed down, Tancredo noted Nugent had apologized for the remark. Critics said it was a half-hearted apology, and Nugent then went on to attack Obama, calling him a lying, law-breaking racist who engages in Nazi tactics. The apology came after Nugent was criticized by a number of Republicans, including Sens. Rand Paul of Kentucky and John McCain of Arizona.

But Nugent has yet to apologize to Colorado!

Nugent: “If ever there was a poster child for apathy, disconnect, laziness, and abandonment of We the People, and moral dereliction, it is Colorado.” 

I’ve been trying to get Boyles to play Nugent’s Colorado insult to Tancredo on air and get his response. It would make great radio.

Meanwhile, here’s a March 25 conversation between Tancredo and Boyles with Tancredo’s take on the conversation he had with space reporter Bartels.

BOYLES: [inaudible] Only you!

TANCREDO: Oh, it’s just great! — A very successful fundraising activity where we gave away an AR-15, and that raised a really big sum of money for us, more than we’ve ever raised before. And, thanks a lot, of course, to Ted Nugent who sent out [laughing] the little email for us. Uh, but, the fellow that we want to give a shout out to at Gunsmoke is a fellow by the name of Brian Midol [spelling?] who indeed is providing the AR-15 for us. [laughing]

BOYLES: Yeah, that’s great! Tom, do this, real quick, can you do – we have got a little bit of time here. But do this, — about the Lynn Bartels phone call – and we—I love—

TANCREDO: Oh, yeah! Yeah!

BOYLES: I’ve known Lynn a thousand years, at The [Denver] Post, Bartels called you.

TANCREDO: [laughing] She calls me up and she says, “Tom,” she says, “I–“ Is this okay? She said, “Tom, I, uh, we’re getting all these emails. Every time you send out something by Ted Nugent, we get all these emails from Republicans and Democrats, saying, ‘This guy is terrible! He said these horrible things! He called the President a mongrel – a lying mongrel!’” And all this stuff. And I said, “Oh, Lynn! I am so glad you called me because I have this great line to use! [laughing] I thought, — when this first happened, I thought of it. And then I thought, ‘Who am I going to tell this to?’ And then here you are, you’ve given me a call.” And I said, “Why this really works out for me, is that, –and why I really like Ted [Nugent] for doing this,– is because –.”

BOYLES: For the first time in your life –.

TANCREDO: Yeah, “For the first time in my life I’m able to say something, that never before have I been able to utter!” And she says, “What’s that?” And I said, “[citing Nugent's comment that Obama is a mongrel] ‘Well, I wouldn’t go that far!’” [laughs]

 

Waller’s promise to be activist AG, in contrast to his opponent, raises questions about other candidates

Friday, March 21st, 2014

Love him or hate him, Scott Gessler has brought an activist’s style to his job as Secretary of State, while others in his position, including Republicans, have tried to stay out of the partisan fray. Ditto for Colorado Attorney General John Suthers.

So going into November, when we’ll be voting for a new AG and SOS, the question is, do we want to elect an AG and SOS in the Gessler/Suthers mold. Or do we want more passive, traditional office holders, regardless of their political party?

It’s an important question for media figures to tease out of the candidates, and reporters can take a cue from State Rep. Mark Waller who addressed the issue spontaneously when asked Sat. by KNUS’ Jimmy Sengenberger what sets him “apart” from his primary challenger, Cynthia Coffman.

WALLER: You know, I think there are a couple of things that set us apart. Number one, we view the role of Attorney General’s office a little differently. You know, [Cynthia Coffman] has said a couple of times that she feels that I’d be more of an ‘activist’ Attorney General, if I were to become the AG, meaning that I would engage more upfront on the development of legislation and fight against bad legislation that’s moving forward. And I would be more. You know, I would take the role as an elected official more seriously and place more focus that way, on the office. Whereas, you know, the way she sees the office, it’s more of a nonpartisan office, where it’s the role and responsibility of the Attorney General to be the the lawyer for the state. So, I think we see those roles a little bit differently…. See, I’m an old military guy, Jimmy. I deployed to Bagdad, Iraq in 2006 where I prosecuted insurgents. I led other lawyers and paralegals there. You know, if I can lead lawyers and paralegals during a war in Bagdad, Iraq, I’m very confident I can do it in the state of Colorado, as well.

Listen to Waller discuss his promise to be activist attorney general

What about Democratic AG candidate Don Quick and the SOS candidates, Dem Joe Neguse and Republican Wayne Williams?

Do they see themselves in the Gessler/partisan mold? Or would they take the more nonpartisan approach of former GOP SOS Natalie Meyer, as explained here?

Where was the radio discussion of how Tancredo’s high-school graduation requirements align with his immigration position?

Thursday, March 20th, 2014

Just after gubernatorial candidate Tom Tancredo departed from from KNUS’ Peter Boyles show this morning, where Boyles told his listeners, “If there’s a god, [Tancredo] becomes governor,” Tancredo talked about immigration with Dan Caplis, whose KNUS radio show starts right after Boyles’.

Caplis: If you had that power, right now, what would you do with the folks who are already here?

Tancredo: …I think everyone who applies for a job in this country should have to be here legally and should have to prove that. Now, certainly, would there be hardships? I have no doubt. But a decision was made when the person came here illegally. I mean, that decision brought with it a lot of ramifications. One is that indeed you may end up having to leave at some point in time. And that means a lot of things to a lot of different people. Leave I-don’t-know-what behind, you know, familiar relationships and all that sort of thing. But you have to determine that you are ok with the idea that people who are here illegally would have to go home. [BigMedia emphasis]

Tancredo isn’t shy about discussing his proposed e-verify solution to the immigration problem, whereby employers would have to run the Social Security numbers of potential employees through a national database prior to hiring them, but Tancredo usually doesn’t mention the “hardships” involved for the undocumented immigrants.

Below, in a 2011 video shot during Tancredo’s 2011 presidential run, Tancredo said, “All you have to do is restrict the ability of an employer to give a job to somebody who is here illegally. People self deport when that happens. It happened in Arizona.”

Today on the radio, Tancredo again said that his e-verify solution “in effect” is “self-deportation,” but his heart peeked through when he talked about the “hardships” of leaving “familiar relationships,” which obviously include children, fathers, mothers, nieces, uncles, neighbors, teachers, entire communities in the most personal sense and beyond. Those are the human hardships involved.

Ironically, Tancredo began his interview with Caplis by saying that, as governor, he’d mandate that, as a high-school graduation requirement, all Colorado students be able “to articulate an appreciation for western civilization, American exceptionalism, and the Constitution.”

Absent was a discussion of how destroying the families and communities of undocumented immigrants fits in with Tancredo’s proposed high-school-graduation criteria.